Chicago Community Databook - Metropolitan Planning Council

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Chicago Community Databook

In coordination with the 2016 Fund for Chicago Neighborhoods, during the summer of 2008, MPC collected, analyzed and mapped data for communities that stood to be the most affected if Chicago won the bid. Despite the International Olympic Committee's decision, MPC’s Community Databook remains a useful resource for these communities, which are ripe for redevelopment.

In coordination with the 2016 Fund for Chicago Neighborhoods, during the summer of 2008, MPC collected, analyzed and mapped data for communities that stood to be the most affected if Chicago won the bid. Despite the International Olympic Committee's decision, MPC’s Community Databook remains a useful resource for these communities, which are ripe for redevelopment.

For each community, data is organized into the following categories: demographics, education, transit/accessibility, housing, building permits, economy, TIF and traffic, retail leakage, crime, parks, and land use (Click on a community name below to access a PDF for each category, if there is no hyperlink check back soon, or contact MPC).

The data used to create this book are as current as possible, and come from a mix of government, nonprofit, and private-sector sources.  Development of this book entailed the creation of a much larger database of information.  MPC is happy to work with local officials, community planning groups, and other stakeholders on deeper, more nuanced analyses than are found in this summary databook.   

This book is objective, providing only data, whether that data illustrates subjectively positive or negative trends, opportunities, or constraints in the selected communities.  The analysis was performed, and indicators chosen for inclusion, based on whether  they were germane to potential community revitalization strategies and investments. 

COMMUNITIES   

Douglas (coming soon)

East Garfield Park

Englewood

Grand Boulevard

Kenwood

Little Village (South Lawndale)

Near South Side

Near West Side

North Lawndale

Oakland (coming soon)

Pilsen (Lower West Side)

Washington Park

Woodlawn

Data sources and methods 

For any questions or comments, please contact Josh Ellis at 312-863-6045 or jellis@metroplanning.org.

Comments

  1. 1. Shirley J. Newsome from Chicago, IL on March 13, 2009


    I fear that the data for the Douglas and Oakland communities has been lumped in with Near South, Grand or Kenwood (which has two distinct communities: North and South Kenwood), which would skew the data represented in the report and certainly not present an accurate picture to the reader who is not familiar with these communities.


  2. 2. Cecilia from Chicago, IL on March 17, 2009


    Where is the Olympic Village? The plan is to locate it north of the Oakland Community, which is the Douglas Community. Why was this not identified, in this project.


  3. 3. Josh Ellis from Chicago, IL on March 18, 2009


    I want to thank everyone for taking a look at, and an interest in, the databook. The intent of the project was to get relevant data into the hands of the communities likely to be most affected should Chicago host the 2016 Summer Games … so I'm happy that people are taking notice.



    All the data that we analyzed for the book, and that we have on file in the larger database, are either available free from public sources (e.g. the U.S. Census, Cook County Assessor, the Regional Transportation Authority) or for sale by private vendors (e.g. ESRI, which makes projections based on Census data). When it comes to data like this, knowing where to go is critical … the purpose of the databook and the database was so people would be able to go to one place – MPC – to get it.



    The terms of our grant from the 2016 Fund for Chicago Communities required us to look at these "community areas," a geographic designation made by the City of Chicago. At the time the grant was made and the research done, the site of the Olympic Village had not yet been identified, which is why Douglas and Oakland were not included in the initial analysis. The two Kenwoods are technically "neighborhoods," which often are smaller in size than "community areas." It's true that neighborhood-to-neighborhood differences can be lost when looking at one scale up, but at the same time, some things (like retail markets, transit and park service areas) are larger than neighborhoods and so have to be viewed appropriately.



    MPC is eager to work with neighborhood and community groups to research and analyze whatever makes the most sense. While our purchase agreements with private vendors precludes us from distributing the raw data, we are happy to help provide answers on any number of development questions.


  4. 4. Tom Paine from Chicago, IL on April 25, 2009


    How about collecting the data, numerous academic studies and dozens of investigative articles and editorials covering the Olympic cost overruns, the leveling of neighborhoods, the displacement, the civil liberties abuse and the massive debt brought on by the Olympics?

    Well, if you can''t find that sort of data on this site, come on over to http://www.nogameschicago.com and check out the material we''ve collected.


  5. 5. Valerie F. Leonard from Chicago, IL on March 11, 2009


    I have not yet read the report, and I applaud MPC for collecting the data and conducting the analysis. However, as a resident of North Lawndale, I am deeply troubled that neither the City, Chicago 2016, our compliment of locally elected officials, local foundations, or community based organizations have shown enough respect for the community to share information or host public meetings on the potential impact of the Olympics on our community. I have asked for this information repeatedly over the past 2 years—verbally and in writing. While I totally "get" what you''re doing, it is unfortunate that MPC has access to information that community residents who may be directly impacted by the Olympics cannot get no matter how many times we ask.


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