Stop, don't yield: Is new crosswalk law working in your community? - Metropolitan Planning Council

Skip to main content

Stop, don't yield: Is new crosswalk law working in your community?

Yesterday, Chicago Tribune transportation reporter Jon Hilkevitch reported that police stings have increased to enforce the new Illinois law requiring drivers to stop, not yield, for pedestrians in crosswalks.

If you're new to our blog, you may not be familiar with this bill; as an organization that advocated for the Pedestrian Safey Act's approval by the Illinois General Assembly, we've written a lot about it because it just makes good sense. Gov. Quinn signed the bill into law in July, but a lot of Illinois drivers don't know about it yet. Admittedly, it's a big change of pace for drivers in the city and suburbs alike, who are accustomed to all but ignoring crosswalks.

Hopefully, with this increased media attention and stronger police enforcement, we'll start to see more drivers shift their habits. Just this morning I noticed a line of cars − even cabs! − break for a pedestrian at a crosswalk in the Loop. How about you? Are you noticing drivers stopping for crosswalks in your town? Do you have any recommendations for where police should focus their enforcement?

| Share

Comments

  1. 1. Richard R. Gill from Chicago on October 1, 2010

    As with any traffic law, it's a matter of enforcement, which is supposed to work as a deterrent. With police stretched thin, crosswalk enforcement is not going to be a high priority. Stop-sign enforcement in Chicago is almost non-existent. As long ago as 1960, California drivers habitually came to a full stop when pedestrians were at a "Ped Xing" location. There was no question about it. Enforcement worked.

This page can be found online at http://www.metroplanning.org/news/5992

Metropolitan Planning Council 140 S. Dearborn St.
Suite 1400
Chicago, Ill. 60603
312 922 5616 info@metroplanning.org

Sign up for newsletter and alerts »